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MIT Siftables

MIT Siftables case study formal page

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It seems to me that if you had a large set of these developed, with each one programmed to represent a different element in the periodic table, you could do a lot in chemistry with them.

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Aug 06, 2009 01:28 pm
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--Portias



This is a great eye-hand interface, with tremendous potential for instant connections. What are the limits, such as capacity of each tile/building block? It seems that tools such as this can be adapted or enhanced and customized for many applicaitons in science, math, even economics and social sciences.

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Aug 16, 2009 06:58 am
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--GaryA



I first encountered these in the TED talk (www.ted.com/talks/david_merrill_demos_siftables_the_smart_blocks.html) and was blown away. There's hardly an element in the school curriculum where Siftables couldn't serve as a tangible, malleable and engaging tool. Chemistry and math certainly leap to mind, but population biology and evolution is perhaps most intriguing for me.

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Sep 29, 2009 04:05 pm
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--Dkleeman



I'm finding myself wondering what direction these objects have taken since that TED talk--which is amazing, by the way. Maybe the people running this site could invite David Merrill to join this discussion (that way Gary's question could answered as well)? I agree with David that you could use these things for virtually any part of any curriculum, but unless they are basically free, I think the creators are going to need to focus on in-school and out-of-school "pain points" in the curriculum that these blocks can be especially useful to address, either natively or because there aren't any really good alternatives, and I wonder what those pain points are. Side note to David: you've really piqued my curiosity--I'm sure if I thought about it enough I could figure it out myself, but I'm dying to know how you'd use Siftables in pop bio and evolution...

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Oct 05, 2009 10:43 am
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--Portias



This reminds me of nanotechnology.

Particularly, the "constellations " of nanorobots (or 'nanite' swarms) comprising of minute robot/processing nodes that can cooperatively function as a whole... etc. Very interesting indeed. Great application of the concepts behind future science and technology. Converging technologies (NBIC's integration methodology) is clearly demonstrated here.

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Oct 22, 2009 12:01 am
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--Jonrf



Hi and pardon my question if it is off topic or incorrect. this type of interface is not my expertise.

I would like to know if I were working with these siftables in one location would they be connected to a set that someone where using elsewhere?

Thanks,

Doug

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Mar 25, 2010 09:57 pm
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--Doug haller



Siftables in the news--check out this article in the New York Times about them:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/11/technology/interactive-cubes-recall-ga...

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Aug 11, 2011 01:39 pm
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--Tomcoty






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